A princess wedding

“Disney recently announced a new line of wedding gowns inspired by Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella that sell for as much $2,900.” Laura M. Holson, The New York Times

Asian-American Avenue

“Now, if you had about a dozen ‘sponsors’ standing up at the ceremony, the guy was wearing a barong tagalog, they had too many people show up because Filipinos don’t really believe in the concept of RSVPing, and there was a lechon and some pancit, buffet-style at the reception - then perhaps I’d say ‘Hey, Ford, you are really talking to my reality. Thanks.’” Al Navarro, on Ford Motor Company’s ‘Wedding Day’ Ad

Center of the Universe

“Teenagers have become so much the focus of everybody else. In a certain sense - at least as far as marketers and parents and maybe law enforcement are concerned - teenagers are the centre of the universe. But it’s not the kind of attention any human being needs. It’s attention trained on how to market to them, predict their behaviour, and, at worst, turn them into compliant mindless consumers. The strange part is that all this marketing seems to work better on the adults than the kids.” Douglas Rushkoff, producer for the award-wining Frontline documentary, The Merchants Of Cool

We need to talk

“If you’ve ever wondered how it works, this is how it works: I don’t call Steve, Steve calls me. Or more accurately, someone in Steve Jobs’s office calls someone in my office—someone at a much higher pay grade —to say that he has something cool. I then fly to the metastasized strip mall called Cupertino, Calif., where Apple lives, sign some legal confidentiality stuff and am escorted to a conference room that contains Jobs, some associates, and some lumps concealed under some black towels. I stare at what was under the towels. Everybody else stares at me. This is how Apple, and nobody else, introduces new products to the press. It can be awkward, because Jobs is high-strung and he expects you to be impressed. I was, fortunately, and with good reason. Apple’s new iPhone could do to the cell phone market what the iPod did to the portable music player market: crush it pitilessly beneath the weight of its own superiority. This is unfortunate for anybody else who makes cell phones, but it’s good news for those of us who use them.” Lev Grossman, Time

Minty fresh

“Forget toothpaste. Now it’s time to put some flavor in your life with Breath Palette. At $161 for a kit of all 31 flavors, who could resist? Looks like an all-natural idea for packaging toothpaste and then selling it for hundreds of times more than was spent to manufacture it… When you face brushing your teeth with flavors such as a Monkey Banana, Sweet Salt, and Darjeeling Tea, you may want to just skip the brushing and have a snack instead.” Gizmodo

Toothpaste

Tim Hortons

“Tim Hortons sells coffee but it truly produces loyalty. It enjoys far better market penetration than Starbucks. When compared against 2006 Census data, Starbucks has an average of one store per 37,000 people in the US, while Tim Hortons has an impressive one store per 12,000 in Canada. This penetration has helped Tim Hortons to essentially eliminate competition in Canada.” Interbrand, Best Canadian Brands 2006

Don’t over do it

“Eight glasses is way too much. We, as a society, are suffering from water abuse. In fact, there are many cases of people who have developed water intoxication, leading to confusion, coma and even death… The body needs on average two liters of water daily. This was misinterpreted to mean eight glasses a day. We get water from many sources, however, include the food we eat. Food provides half and sometimes more of our requirements, leaving only one litre to be made up in liquids.” Suzanne Carere, George Brown College Professor of Nutrition

Fame

“I had a guy come up to me, in my face, saying, ‘You think you’re so cool? You’re not cool’ and I’m saying to him, ‘Dude, it’s a commercial.’ ” Justin Long, on playing the slacker-hip Apple Mac guy to John Hodgman’s nerdy PC guy

Get a Mac

Soy frustrating

“It may no rank up there with milk, eggs and peanuts, but in terms of being a problem, it’s unsurpassed… Soy is used as filler in meats and sauces, commercially baked products, chewing gum, snack foods, milk substitutes and even cosmetics… One other problem is labelling. It’s one thing to read in a label that a product has soy, but another to try to decipher such ingredients as edamame, miso, mono-diglyceride or vegetable proteins.” Toronto Star’s Peter Krivel, on the problems associated with soy allergy

Human comforts

“Let me tell you something about hew-mans, nephew. They’re a wonderful, friendly people, as long as their bellies are full and their holosuites are working. But take away their creature comforts, deprive them of food, sleep, sonic showers, put their lives in jeopardy over an extended period of time… And those same friendly, intelligent, wonderful people, will become as nasty and as violent as the most bloodthirsty Klingon. You don’t believe me? Look at those faces, look at their eyes…” Quark to his nephew Nog, Star Trek: Deep Space 9

Quark and Nog