In my language

“Someone mentioned being dropped in the woods alone. That’s an interesting example… There are many other stories of autistic children — some thought to not understand a whole lot — who suddenly perform very well in survival situations. I have said before that I would probably perform better in a survival situation than in an apartment. In an apartment, the steps required to get things like sustenance are pretty divorced from what the things around you tell you. There’s nothing about refrigerators or stoves that tells me how to get food from them, and that’s something I in fact have a good deal of trouble with. In a survival situation, obtaining food becomes a much more physical and practical problem, something that I could probably handle better. It’s been shown that if you put me alone in an apartment for awhile, I can’t pick up any environmental cues for how to do things, so I don’t do a lot (I am not as good at most purely internally-directed physical actions). In a survival situation there are a wide variety of environmental cues that would prompt me into more action more readily. (Even living on the streets, which I only did for a few days during a housing problem, makes what needs to be done more apparent than living in an apartment.) This is of course not true for all of us, but I don’t doubt that it would be true for a substantial minority, and stories seem to bear that out.” Silent Miaow, an autistic woman who comments on her YouTube video, In My Own Language

Robin Hood restaurants

“Deciding between the spicy peanut stew and the pesto chicken, or the squash soup and the avocado, chicken, lime soup, are not the only decisions tempting patrons at the One World Café in Salt Lake City and the SAME So All Might Eat Café in Denver. They must also decide what the meal is worth. These pay-as-you-can cafes have missions that are unapologetically altruistic—call it serving up fare Robin Hood style… Customers who have no money are encouraged to exchange an hour of service — sweep, wash the dishes, weed the organic garden — for a meal. Likewise, guests who have money are encouraged to leave a little extra to offset the meals of those who have less to give.” Peta Owens-Liston, Time.com

The new strategy

“In a world where strategy is a commodity, creativity becomes the vital factor from which value flows. When everyone can think strategically about everything, the locus of value creation shifts from out-thinking everyone to out-creating them… Now, we see the hints of the revolution everywhere—from the death of mass culture/blockbusters, to the rise of free culture, to the exploding investment in innovation and design, to the flight of capital away from the US. I think it is going to create enormous challenges for firms—challenges which can’t be answered by thinking strategically; but can only be faced by thinking creatively.” Bubblegeneration

The gay animal kingdom

“Male big horn sheep live in what are often called ‘homosexual societies.’ They bond through genital licking and anal intercourse, which often ends in ejaculation. If a male sheep chooses to not have gay sex, it becomes a social outcast. Ironically, scientists call such straight-laced males ‘effeminate.’ Giraffes have all-male orgies. So do bottlenose dolphins, killer whales, gray whales, and West Indian manatees… As this list of activities suggests, having homosexual sex is the biological equivalent of apple pie: Everybody likes it.” Jonah Lehrer on Stanford University biology professor Joan Roughgarden’s controversial book, Evolution’s Rainbow

Information junkies

“Neuroscientists have proposed a simple explanation for the pleasure of grasping a new concept: The brain is getting its fix. The ‘click’ of comprehension triggers a biochemical cascade that rewards the brain with a shot of natural opium-like substances… The brain’s craving for a fix motivates humans to maximize the rate at which they absorb knowledge.” Edward Vessel, on a recent study by the University of Southern California

Perfection

“Plato suggested that everything in our world is just an approximation of perfection. He also realized that we understand the concept of perfection even though we never encountered it. He came to conclusion that perfect mathematical forms must live in another world and that we somehow know about them by having a connection to that “alternative” universe.” Functional Programming For The Rest of Us

Jealous?

“So if the difference between Christian faith and all other forms of spirituality is that Christian faith offers a relational dynamic with God, why are we cloaking this relational dynamic in formulas? Are we jealous of the Mormons?” Author Donald Miller, in “Searching for God Knows What”

Innovation

“In 1956, a Japanese entrepreneur named Mr. Y. Okada stumbled on an innovation that would end up making life better for homeowners around the globe. It happened one day at lunch, while he was breaking apart sections of a chocolate bar and thought, “Why not apply this same concept of snap-off sections to a factory-sharpened utility knife blade?” When the tip becomes dull, simply break it off at the scored division, exposing a fresh, sharp end.” Toronto Star, 10 Top Tools: OLFA L-1 Utility Knife

Tastes like paper

“But the sushi made by Mr. Cantu, the 28-year-old executive chef at Moto in Chicago, often contains no fish. It is prepared on a Canon i560 inkjet printer rather than a cutting board. He prints images of maki on pieces of edible paper made of soybeans and cornstarch, using organic, food-based inks of his own concoction. He then flavors the back of the paper, which is ordinarily used to put images onto birthday cakes, with powdered soy and seaweed seasonings.” David Bernstein, The New York Times

Mr. Cantu

But nobody there will listen to me

“You know, I’ve got a plan that could rescue Apple. I can’t say any more than that it’s the perfect product and the perfect strategy for Apple. But nobody there will listen to me.” Steve Jobs, Fortune magazine - Sept. 18, 1995